Priit is the founder and CEO of DreamGrow Digital, an internet marketing and social media company. With his 20+ years internet marketing experience he is Helping companies to understand and use the digital marketing to reach their target audiences. He's also writing on a personal growth website FixWillPower.com. He has spoken at hundreds of seminars and conferences on different aspects of internet marketing. Priit is also the organizer of Digital Elite Camp, a leading traffic and conversion event.
I do not think this is how most people use YouTube. YouTube videos are more like blog posts, and fit more effectively into the niche of content marketing. Sure, people will comment—but they do so in a manner similar to how they comment on blog posts. They come to view and digest videos, not necessarily share their thoughts about the day. Because of this, you should approach YouTube as content marketing instead of social media marketing.
YouTube also has an enormous and very diverse audience, which happily uses both YouTube’s and Google’s own search engine to find content they’re looking for. If you’re able to optimize for the right keywords (and I’ll show you how to do that later in this guide!), you’ll be able to connect with that audience instantly, instead of hoping a Facebook Ad shows up in their feed. This allows them to find also has an enormous and very diverse audience, which happily uses both YouTube’s and Google’s own search engine to find content they’re looking for. If you’re able to optimize for the right keywords (and I’ll show you how to do that later in this guide!), you’ll be able to connect with that audience instantly, instead of hoping a Facebook Ad shows up in their feed. This allows them to find you, not the other way around.

Channel trailer:Your trailer should be short and sweet (around 30 to 60 seconds). Focus on showing visitors what your channel is about and what they can expect to see in your videos. Don't forget to encourage them to subscribe. Your trailer won’t be interrupted by ads, which will keep the user focused on why they should watch more videos from your brand.

One of the best ways to improve the look of your video is to include b-roll. B-roll is the supplementary footage included as a cutaway. This might include shots of a customer service rep talking on a phone, a designer editing your website, visuals of your office, or even screenshots of your product. The key with b-roll is to make sure each and every piece enhances the story.
By creating information-dense, accessible, easy-to-interact-with video content, brands can develop a substantial online following and promote customer recall. For an example of a company that’s done this particularly well, consider Headspace, a meditation app that became a $250 million business. The app offers multiple levels of meditation, employing gamification to increase engagement. Users must complete and master each meditation level before advancing. Most sessions are in video format, beautifully crafted with illustrations and layouts true to the brand. It is elegant, consistent and engaging, heavily relying on video.
Instead, place a laptop below the eye-line of the camera. Break the script into short paragraphs and record it section by section until you capture a great take of each. If you plan in advance when the final video will show b-roll (supplementary footage or screenshots), you can have your talent read those lines directly off the laptop like a voice over.

3. Upload your channel art — Channel art is the banner/header that appears towards the top of your channel when viewed on a desktop. Upload a large image (2560×1440) with the most important visual elements located in the inner 1546×423 area (so they’ll still appear when the image is scaled for mobile and tablet). See the image below for various display dimensions.
As I mentioned, YouTube is one of the biggest websites around – to be more specific, it’s currently the second most popular website in the world. And even though most people don’t think of YouTube primarily as a search engine, that’s exactly what most visitors do on the site. YouTube’s not just the second most popular website; it’s also the second most popular search engine – topped only by Google. This means that the platform presents a huge potential for reach for your business.
Channel optimization, much like video optimization, means optimizing for the algorithm and the audience. You need to use keywords, metadata, and other best practices to perform better in search and suggested videos. You also need to create a viewing experience that rewards continued viewing and makes the channel appealing to the viewer right off the bat.
Bottom line, overall strategy and data should drive your video marketing strategy. First, plan a solid strategy to develop video(s) for each level of your sales funnel. Outline the content and goals of each individual video. Determine what metrics will best determine a video’s success. Then, test. Analyze. Tweak your videos (and their deployment), when necessary. Work to make them more effective. And whatever you do, do do video; in 2017 and beyond, it’s the cornerstone of your brand’s marketing efforts.
In the film industry, this step is called location scouting, and like every other step in this process, it’s an important part of creating a compelling video. To get started, take a look at your storyboard, and create a list of the different locations each scene requires. Depending on your video concept, you may only need one location ... or you may need a new location for each scene. 

First, head to youtube.com/analytics. You should be directed to an analytics dashboard that shows an overview of how your videos have been performing during the past 28 days. You can adjust the analytics timeframe by clicking on the drop-down menu in the upper right-hand corner. The overview report features some top-line performance metrics, engagement metrics, demographics, traffic sources, and popular content.
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