You can choose a feature video from any of your uploads, or create a video specifically for this purpose. I recommend doing the latter; it allows you to create a short video (no more than 90 seconds, preferably) to welcome viewers to your channel and explain what you can offer them. This brief clip may not seem like a big deal, but in my experience it can go a long way in getting people to subscribe.
Another big reason why YouTube is such an attractive option for marketing purposes is that it’s all about video – and video marketing is all the rage right now. Video has consistently proven itself as one of the best-performing forms of content in terms of engagement, and just because you’re creating them for YouTube doesn’t mean that you can’t repurpose your videos. These videos would be great for your other social profiles, your email marketing campaigns, your website and landing pages, and any other platforms or channels you might be using.

In that case, it might be best to respond to those questions with a link to your video. If you created a video as part of a larger campaign or global trend, be sure to include relevant #hashtags where appropriate to ensure your video is included in the conversation. If you created a video to build awareness around your brand, consider posting the link in your profile bios.
Plus, the money you’ll make as a result of these monetization options isn’t exactly going to be sending you into early retirement. You might make something like $1 per 1,000 views, and you can’t even get paid until you hit the $100 mark. For most businesses, this takes ages. Many find that it’s not worth the risk of losing viewers for pennies of potential profit.
Just as the YouTube Creator Academy preaches getting to the point quickly in channel trailers, Brian Dean of Backlinko asserts the first 15 seconds of your video is the ideal portion to optimize. Why? Because viewers will decide within that first 15 seconds whether your video is the real deal. Once you’ve got their buy-in, your video will naturally accrue greater watch time, improving your ranking signals.

When researching keywords, I recommend doing keyword research both for Google, and specifically for YouTube. This way, you’ll make sure that you’re ranking as best you can on both search engines, increasing views significantly. Any of the top keyword research tools will work for Google (I discuss them in-depth here), and I most recommend keywordtool.io’s YouTube-specific search. Prioritize the keywords you find in the YouTube search, as this will be your best bet for being found.
Bottom line, overall strategy and data should drive your video marketing strategy. First, plan a solid strategy to develop video(s) for each level of your sales funnel. Outline the content and goals of each individual video. Determine what metrics will best determine a video’s success. Then, test. Analyze. Tweak your videos (and their deployment), when necessary. Work to make them more effective. And whatever you do, do do video; in 2017 and beyond, it’s the cornerstone of your brand’s marketing efforts.
What does aperture mean for your video? When a lot of light comes into the camera (with a low f-stop number), you get a brighter image and a shallow depth of field. This is great for when you want your subject to stand out against a background. When less light comes into the camera (with a high f-stop number), you get what's called deep depth of field and are able to maintain focus across a larger portion of your frame.

After you've determined the type of music you need, it's time to start analyzing potential songs. Consider the song's pacing. Songs with a steady rhythm are easy to change to suit your video style. Hoping to include your favorite, Top 40 hit? Popular, radio songs are usually structured in 4-5 parts and can be difficult to transition. Try to choose simple songs that are easy to loop. If you're looking for an instrumental song, be sure to find something that was recorded with real instruments. Songs made with digital samples can make your video feel unprofessional and out of date.
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