Providing the right information in your video’s metadata ensures that it is properly indexed by YouTube and appears when people are searching for videos like yours. Be succinct and straightforward when filling out your metadata — your content could be removed if you try to promote it with unrelated keywords. Check out the video below to learn more about optimizing your video for search.

I do not think this is how most people use YouTube. YouTube videos are more like blog posts, and fit more effectively into the niche of content marketing. Sure, people will comment—but they do so in a manner similar to how they comment on blog posts. They come to view and digest videos, not necessarily share their thoughts about the day. Because of this, you should approach YouTube as content marketing instead of social media marketing.
The inbound methodology is the marketing and sales approach focused on attracting customers through content and interactions that are relevant and helpful. Each video you create should acknowledge your audience's challenges and provide a solution. Looking at the big picture, this content guides consumers through the journey of becoming aware of, evaluating, and purchasing your product or service.

For channel art, choose something that represents your business while being visually dynamic. I highly recommend using graphic design tool Snappa to create your YouTube channel art. They have pre-made templates that are sized to fit your channel perfectly, all of which are fully customizable. Try to use similar colors, fonts, and stylistic choices that you make on your website and profile picture. You can also add text to help get your point or brand across more quickly. A great example is AdEspresso’s own channel art:
There has been an overhaul in ad content lately, due to controversy when ads were being shown on videos that contained extremism, hate speech, and other content businesses did not want to be associated with. Now, channels of arms dealers, political commentators, and even video games have seen fewer ads on their content. This only really affects those who are trying to monetize their YouTube by placing ads on their site, not so much for those running the ads.
Within your channel itself, you can also organize videos into playlists, making it easy for your audience to search within your content. As a social platform, viewers can engage with your videos by liking and commenting on them, providing you another chance to interact with your audience. YouTube also offers a variety of advertising options for more sophisticated targeting.
Not only will transactional searchers who already know the Brafton name be able to find us but so too will informational users simply looking for “creative content marketing.” Plus, providing this next-level search-friendly info, you teach YouTube (and Google) how to properly crawl and index your channel, which allows search engines to better serve search results.

I do not think this is how most people use YouTube. YouTube videos are more like blog posts, and fit more effectively into the niche of content marketing. Sure, people will comment—but they do so in a manner similar to how they comment on blog posts. They come to view and digest videos, not necessarily share their thoughts about the day. Because of this, you should approach YouTube as content marketing instead of social media marketing.

I recommend that your account picture (which you set through your Google account) is some sort of brand logo. If you’re a one-person business, it can be a professional headshot of you. Ideally, it should match your profile pictures on other social media accounts for instant brand recognition. This works both ways; if ones of your followers from another site comes across your YouTube, you want them to recognize you so they’re more likely to watch. And, vice versa, if a viewer Googles you, you want them to be sure that the Facebook profile they’re clicking on is actually you. To change your channel art, just click on it when editing your profile.


Case studies: Another way you can promote your business and your products or services is to create video case studies of your clients. These case studies don’t need to deal exclusively with your product: they can focus on client origin stories, recent achievements, or plans for the future. Hootsuite publishes videos of their work with different brands:
While you’re on the quest to find and attract new customers and leads, don’t forget about the ones you already have. Share your video content and channel with relevant email lists. Encourage your contacts to check out a blog post you’ve in which embedded a video to increase both the video and website traffic or direct them to a relevant playlist you’ve curated. Sending an email newsletter with valuable information and video content is another great way to keep your contacts engaged.

Listicles: Listicles are a very popular content format, both as blog posts and as media (videos, images, infographics, etc.). You can create listicles that highlight your products or services – like “The 10 most innovative ways you can use (your product)” – or they can be educational, informational, or entertaining. Just remember, the lists should always be relevant to your audiences’ interests and your business niche.

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